Authors
Yang L, Ge M, Guo J, Wang Q, Jiang X, Yan W. (2007). A simulation for effects of RF electromagnetic radiation from a mobile handset on eyes model using the finite-difference time-domain method. Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc. 2007: 5294-7.

Background
Increasing use of mobile phones and proximity of a mobile handset antenna to the eye make it important to study possible adverse effects of the radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic radiation emitted by mobile phones on the eye. Because metal is a good electrical conductor, glasses with metal frames should be taken into consideration in such studies.

Objective

A computer simulation study was conducted in order to evaluate the specific absorption rate (SAR) distribution in a human head exposed to 900 MHz electromagnetic radiation.

Methods

The computations were conducted by applying finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) modeling technique. For simulation scenarios, the FDTD method can be key to solve the complex problems of radiofrequency fields. The FDTD method is proven to be the most efficient method amongst many means to compute the RF energy absorption in the physiological system.

Results

The simulations provided the peak values of SAR averaged over 1 g tissue at the radiation power of 600 mW. The maximum SAR value around the eye region was estimated to be 1.52 W/kg based on the eye model and 2.91 W/kg based on the eye model with metal frame glasses. The latter value is somewhat higher than the safety limits set by the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (1.6 W/kg averaged over 1 g tissue) and by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (2 W/kg averaged over 10 g tissue).

Interpretation and Conclusion

The authors have concluded that the peak value of SAR in the eye tissue, resulted from exposure to 900 MHz radiation in individuals wearing glasses with metal frame, may exceed safety limits. They suggest that RF radiation emitted by mobile phones may produce more harm to the eyes when wearing metal frame glasses, compared to glasses with non-metal frame or no glasses.


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