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Mayo 2010

Epidemiological studies should include cordless phone use in RF phone exposure.

The objective of the study was to evaluate the access and use of cordless phones in the MoRPhEUS study in Australia. Participants, who were 317 grade 7 students from Melbourne, completed a questionnaire on exposure from telephones. Results were that 87% of students had access to a cordless phone at home and 77% owned a mobile phone. Regarding telephone use, the authors found a statistically significant positive association between cordless and mobile phone use. The authors concluded that the results show that radiofrequency fields (RF) exposure is increased because of cordless phone exposure and that future research should also account and assess cordless phone use in order to fully characterize RF exposure.

Redmayne M, Inyang I, Dimitriadis C, Benke G, Abramson MJ. (2010). Cordless telephone use: implications for mobile phone research. J Environ Monit. 12(4):809-12.

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Quality control procedures increase assurance of field measurements from dosimeters

The objective of the study was to verify the performance of dosimeters used for exposure assessment of radiofrequency fields by developing a quality control strategy. The reliability of field values recorded by the dosimeters was included in the study design. Results of the study showed that 19 out of 20 dosimeters evaluated were very stable and results could be reproduced. They found only one dosimeter to work improperly and this set of data was excluded from the analysis. The authors concluded that continuous quality control procedures can increase the confidence in the field measurements from epidemiological studies.

Bornkessel C, Blettner M, Breckenkamp J, Berg-Beckhoff G. Quality control for exposure assessment in epidemiological studies. Radiat Prot Dosimetry. Mar 21, 2010 Ahead of print.

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Regular exposure from mobile phone use associated with personality traits in Australian adolescents

The investigators studied the potential predictors of mobile phone use in Australian adolescents as this group is increasingly using these wireless devices. A self-administered questionnaire based on the one from INTERPHONE study was developed and used to determine exposure from mobile phone use. The investigators assessed the determinants of the use of mobile phone with self-reported number of incoming and outgoing voice calls as a proxy for true exposure. The results indicate that a high prevalence of mobile phone use (94%) exist amongst Australian adolescents. Personality traits associated with regular mobile phone use include: higher psychoticism scores and a tendency for adolescents who reported higher extraversion scores. Parental socio-economic status (SES) was also associated with mobile phone use in adolescents. The Australian investigators concluded that regular mobile phone exposure was associated with personality traits, parental SES and perceived health risks of using mobile phones were all found to be associated with use of wireless telephones.

Inyang I, Benke G, Dimitriadis C, Simpson P, McKenzie R, Abramson M. Predictors of mobile telephone use and exposure analysis in Australian adolescents. J Paediatr Child Health. Mar 10, 2010 Ahead of print.

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Variations of distance between head and mobile phone as a function of age and its impact on peak spatial SAR

The objective of the experiment was to look into the variations of the distance between the top of the mobile phone and the head tissue (referred to as the pinna). Age of the exposed subjects (adult vs children 6-8 years) was taken into account, and also the influence of mechanical force on the pinna and the impact on peak spatial specific absorption rate (SAR). The results of this experiment showed that no differences were found in average distances of the pinnae between adults and children. It was determined, by numerical exposure analysis that reduced distance due to the pinna compression could change in an upward trend maximum 10 g peak SAR rate estimated at 2 dB for adults and children if the maximum exposure considered was the top of the mobile phone.

Christ A, Gosselin MC, Kühn S, Kuster N. Impact of pinna compression on the RF absorption in the heads of adult and juvenile cell phone users. Bioelectromagnetics. Mar 30, 2010 Ahead of print.

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Modeling method to choose RF exposure metric (peak SAR or S(inc)) in the range 1-10 GHz

The objective of the study was to determine the appropriate crossover frequency at which incident power flux density (S(inc)) can be used instead of the peak 10 g averaged specific absorption rate (SAR) for the basic restriction value which will protect humans of the heating effects of radiofrequency fields (RF) in the 1-10 GHz range. Heterogeneous head models of an adult and 12 year old child were analyzed during numerous exposure conditions at various frequencies (1,3,6,8,10 GHz). The modeling results showed that peak DeltaT had a better correlation with peak 10 g SAR than S(inc) at 1 and 3 GHz but with S(inc) at frequencies of 6, 8, and  10 GHz. From their results, the authors recommended that the breakpoint when choosing peak SAR or S(inc) be the 6 GHz frequency. 

McIntosh RL, Anderson V. SAR versus S(inc): What is the appropriate RF exposure metric in the range 1-10 GHz? Part II: Using complex human body models. Bioelectromagnetics. March 30, 2010 Ahead of print.

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Betts KS. (2009) Electromagnetic fields: Conference, hearing call up cell phone use. Environ Health Perspect. 117(11):A486.

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Villeneuve PJ, Miller AB. Comments on Kheifets et al. "extremely low frequency electric fields and cancer: Assessing the evidence" Bioelectromagnetics Mar 30, 2010 Ahead of print.
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