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Marzo 2011

50-minute mobile phone exposure associated with increased brain glucose metabolism

The objective of the study was to determine whether acute mobile phone exposure affects brain glucose metabolism. The study was a randomized crossover study and included 47 healthy participants. Cell phones were placed on the left and right ears and the brain glucose metabolism was measured twice; the mobile phone activated on the right for 50 minutes and then while both mobile phones were turned off. The results indicate that whole-brain metabolism was not changed between on and off conditions. The metabolism in the region closest to the antenna was reported to be significantly higher when mobile phone was on compared to off. The authors concluded that a 50-minute mobile phone exposure was associated with increased brain glucose metabolism in the region closest to the antenna. They indicate that the result is of unknown clinical significance.

Volkow ND, Tomasi D, Wang GJ, Vaska P, Fowler JS, Telang F, Alexoff D, Logan J, Wong C. (2011). Effects of cell phone radiofrequency signal exposure on brain glucose metabolism. JAMA. 305(8):808-13.

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Lai H, Hardell L. (2011). Editorial. Cell phone radiofrequency radiation exposure and brain glucose metabolism. JAMA. 305(8):828-9.

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Increased risk was found for glioma and use of mobile or cordless phone in analyses of two case-control studies

The objective of the study was to conduct a pooled analysis of two case-control studies of malignant brain tumour subjects. Participants were 1,251 (85% response rate) cases and 2,438 (84%) controls. The results indicate that the highest risk was found for the astrocytoma tumour. For individuals who used their mobile phone >10 year, the odds ratio (OR) was 2.7 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.9-3.7). For cordless phone use, the OR was 1.8 (95% CI = 1.2-2.9). The authors concluded that an increased risk was found for glioma and use of mobile or cordless phone and it also increased with latency time and cumulative use in hours.

Hardell L, Carlberg M, Hansson Mild K. Pooled analysis of case-control studies on malignant brain tumours and the use of mobile and cordless phones including living and deceased subjects. Int J Oncol. Feb 17, 2011. Ahead of print.

For more see “Research – epidemiological – cell phone studies
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Study of incidence rates in brain cancer in England; no time trends found

The objective of the study was to examine trends in incidence rates of brain cancer cases in England between 1998 and 2007. The results indicate that there were no time trends in overall incidence of brain cancers. This was true for either gender or any age group. Thus, increased use of mobile phones between 1985 and 2003 in England has not led to an evident change in the incidence of brain cancer. The authors concluded that their data do not indicate the need to implement a precautionary principle.

de Vocht F, Burstyn I, Cherrie JW. Time trends (1998-2007) in brain cancer incidence rates in relation to mobile phone use in England. Bioelectromagnetics. Jan 28, 2011. Ahead of print.

For more see “Research – epidemiological – cell phone studies
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Ostrom QT, Barnholtz-Sloan JS. Current State of Our Knowledge on Brain Tumor Epidemiology. Curr Neurol Neurosci Rep. Feb 19, 2011. Ahead of print.

For more see “Research – epidemiological – cell phone studies
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Simulations of recall and selection bias in case-control study CEFALO

The objective of the study was to evaluate how random and systematic recall error and selection bias effect odds ratios (ORs). The authors completed simulations for regular and heavy users using data from a case-control study named CEFALO.  Results indicate that cases overestimated their number of calls by 9% and duration of calls by 52% on average. For controls, it was 34% and 163%, respectively. Assessing the combined effect of recall error and selection bias was determined to be difficult.

Aydin D, Feychting M, Schüz J, Andersen TV, Poulsen AH, Prochazka M, Klaeboe L, Kuehni CE, Tynes T, Röösli M. Impact of random and systematic recall errors and selection bias in case-control studies on mobile phone use and brain tumors in adolescents (CEFALO study). Bioelectromagnetics. Feb 3, 2011. Ahead of print.

For more see “Research – exposure assessment
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Daus AW, Goldhammer M, Layer PG, Thielemann C. Electromagnetic exposure of scaffold-free three-dimensional cell culture systems. Bioelectromagnetics. Jan 28, 2011. Ahead of print.

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Can radiofrequency exposure induce cytostatic responses on cancer cell lines?

This study investigates the response of two human cancer cell lines to a 24 h exposure to a 2.2 GHz pulse modulated radar-like signal. The RF exposure induced a consistent, statistically significant reduction in the cell number in the neuroblastoma NB69 cell line. The data indicates that the pulse modulated RF exposure can induce cytostatic responses on specific, sensitive cancer cell lines.

Trillo MA, Cid MA, Martínez MA, Page JE, Esteban J, Ubeda A. Cytostatic response of NB69 cells to weak pulse-modulated 2.2 GHz radar-like signals. Bioelectromagnetics. Jan 28, 2011. Ahead of print.

For more see “Research – laboratory – cancer studies
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Use of external fans has no influence on anticipated nonthermal effects of RF on brain

This study examined whether the extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields from the fan (50 Hz, 0.3–1.5 μT) might add to the RF nonthermal effect of RF fields. The results indicated that use of external fans has had no major influence upon the result.

Nittby H, Brun A, Strömblad S, Moghadam MK, Sun W, Malmgren L, Eberhardt J, Persson BR, Salford LG. Nonthermal GSM RF and ELF EMF effects upon rat BBB permeability. The Environmentalist. Jan 29, 2011. Ahead of print.

For more see “Research – laboratory – brain function
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Possible protective effects of green tea polyphenols against electromagnetic-induced injury

This study investigated the possible protective effects of green tea polyphenols against electromagnetic radiation-induced injury in the cultured rat cortical neurons. Results suggested a neuroprotective effect of green tea polyphenols against the mobile phone irradiation-induced injury on the cultured rat cortical neurons.

Liu ML, Wen JQ, Fan YB. Potential Protection of Green Tea Polyphenols Against 1800 MHz Electromagnetic Radiation-Induced Injury on Rat Cortical Neurons. Neurotox Res. Feb 4, 2011. Ahead of print.

For more see “Research – laboratory – brain function
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Significant reduction in hematopoietic damage caused by exposure to RF fields

This study investigates whether an adaptive response can be induced in mice which were pre-exposed to 900 MHz RF fields. Pre-exposure of mice to RF fields showed a significant reduction in hematopoietic damage caused by subsequent exposure.

Cao Y, Xu Q, Jin ZD, Zhou Z, Nie JH, Tong J. Induction of adaptive response: Pre-exposure of mice to 900 MHz radiofrequency fields reduces hematopoietic damage caused by subsequent exposure to ionising radiation. Int J Radiat Biol. Feb 7, 2011. Ahead of print.

For more see “Research – laboratory – other – cell cycle progression
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Effect of RF fields on protein kinase activity

The study suggests that a reduction in protein kinase activity may be related to overproduction of reactive oxygen species under RF field exposure. The authors concluded that a decrease in sperm count and an increase in apoptosis could be caused by mobile radiation exposure and lead to infertility.

Kesari KK, Kumar S, Behari J. (2010). Mobile phone usage and male infertility in Wistar rats. Indian J Exp Biol. 48(10):987-92.

For more see “Research – laboratory – reproduction
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RF field affect spermatogenesis and apoptosis

This study investigated the effects of 2450 MHz RF field on apoptosis and histopathological changes in rat testis tissue. The authors conclude that RF field exposure affects spermatogenesis and apoptosis.

Saygin M, Caliskan S, Karahan N, Koyu A, Gumral N, Uguz AC. Testicular apoptosis and histopathological changes induced by a 2.45 GHz electromagnetic field. Toxicol Ind Health. Feb 10, 2011. Ahead of print.

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No evidence that RF fields affect gene expression

This study investigated the effects of exposure to RF fields at specific absorption rate on gene expression in a normal human glial cell line, SVGp12, using DNA microarray. No evidence was found that exposure to RF fields affect gene expression.

Sakurai T, Kiyokawa T, Narita E, Suzuki Y, Taki M, Miyakoshi J. Analysis of Gene Expression in a Human-derived Glial Cell Line Exposed to 2.45 GHz Continuous Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Fields. J Radiat Res (Tokyo). Feb 19, 2011. Ahead of print.

For more see “Research – laboratory – cancer studies
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Israel M, Ivanova M, Zaryabova V. Criticism of the philosophy for development of standards for non-ionizing radiation. The Environmentalist. Jan 18, 2011. Ahead of print.

For more see “Bibliography – review papers – general
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Behari J. (2010). Biological responses of mobile phone frequency exposure. IJEB 48(10): 959-981.

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