J

     
 


March 2010

No associations between the use of electronic media (including mobile phones) and headache in adolescent population

The objective of the epidemiological study was to assess whether associations exist between frequent use of electronic media and the prevalence of various types of headache in German adolescents. A population-based sample of 1,025 adolescents aged 13 to 17 years old was the source of the data for the study analyses. The authors determined the type of headache using standardized questionnaires for those who had noted headaches (at least once/month in the last 6 months). A personal interview was conducted to evaluate the duration of electronic media use. Results indicate that only 23% of the participants used their mobile phones daily. The authors concluded that other than an association between listening to music daily and overall headache, their study found no consistent associations between the use of electronic media and headaches.

Milde-Busch A, von Kries R, Thomas S, Heinrich S, Straube A, Radon K. The association between use of electronic media and prevalence of headache in adolescents: results from a population-based cross-sectional study. BMC Neurol. Feb 9, 2010. 10(1):12. Ahead of print.

For more see “Research – epidemiological – cell phone studies
Go to abstract>

Go to full summary >


Pattern of ownership and use of mobile phones in Iranian medical students

The objective of the study was to determine ownership and mobile phone use in Iranian medical students and personal views about potential adverse health effects. A cross-sectional study with 309 students was completed using a self-administrated questionnaire. The results indicate that daily mean talking time was 28 minutes and listening to music on the mobile phone was 51.9 minutes. The use of mobile phones at home was 87.2%, on the street (79.6%), in a classroom (37.6%), while driving (18.6%), and in the library (17.8%).

Mazloomy Mahmoodabad SS, Barkhordari A, Nadrian H, Moshiri O, Yavari MT. 2009. Survey of ownership and use of mobile phones among medical science students in Yazd. Pak J Biol Sci. 12(21):1430-3.

For more see “Research – epidemiological – cell phone studies
Go to abstract>

Go to full summary >

Study indicates that transthyretin could explain findings of benefits from radiofrequency fields (RF) exposure in study of Alzheimer’s Disease mice

The objective of the study was to assess whether cerebrospinal fluid transthyretin could explain the RF exposure cognitive benefits found in a previous animal study. A provocation study was done on 41 individuals who were exposed for 30 minutes to 890-MHz GSM band (SAR=1.0 Watt/Kg) to the temporal lobe of the brain. Results indicate that there was a statistically significantly increased serum transthyretin 60 minutes after GSM exposure. The authors suggest that transthyretin could possibly explain the recent results of RF exposure benefit in Alzheimer’s disease mice.

Söderqvist F, Hardell L, Carlberg M, Mild KH. Radiofrequency Fields, Transthyretin, and Alzheimer's Disease. J Alzheimers Dis. Feb 17, 2010.  Ahead of print.

For more see “Research – clinical – cognitive function
Go to abstract>

Study indicates possible inner ear damage in long-term and intensive mobile phone users

The objective of the study was to evaluate the health effects of chronic exposure from GSM mobile phones on human auditory functions. The study design was a retrospective cross-sectional randomized case control conducted in a tertiary care hospital. A total of 112 subjects who were long-term mobile phone users (more than 1 year) and 50 controls that had never used a mobile phone were included in the study. Participants went through audiologic tests and changes in the measured parameters were analyzed in the mobile phone, and non-mobile phone-using ears of long-term users versus controls to assess the health effects of GSM phone exposure. Results indicate that there was no significant difference between users and controls for any of the audiologic parameters. The authors did note trends for audiologic abnormalities in mobile phone users, and some complaints in users during mobile phone use showed changes in some parameters. It was concluded that long-term as well as intensive mobile phone use could cause inner ear damage. A larger study with more subjects is needed to confirm the results obtained in this study suggest the authors.

Panda NK, Jain R, Bakshi J, Munjal S. (2010). Audiologic disturbances in long-term mobile phone users. J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 39(1):5-11.

For more see “Research – clinical – other – hearing
Go to abstract>

Go to full summary >


SAR levels in foetuses slightly lower than mother in mice models.

In this study, the objective was to compare the exposure and the resultant temperature changes in the foetuses with that of the dam (mother). The pregnant mouse model and eight mature foetuses, was used specifically to evaluate the radiofrequency fields (RF) dosimetry in a radial cavity exposure system at 900 MHz, and a 900 MHz plane wave exposure. The results indicate that the SAR levels in the foetuses were lower by about 14% than the SAR values of the mother. The peak temperature increase was significantly lower by 45% than the values in the mother. The authors concluded that their results can be helpful to find power levels required to provide given exposure levels in foetuses of similar dimensions than mice.

McIntosh RL, Deppeler L, Oliva M, Parente J, Tambuwala F, Turner S, Winship D, Wood AW. Comparison of radiofrequency exposure of a mouse dam and foetuses at 900 MHz. Phys Med Biol. Jan 28, 2010 55(4):N111-N122. Ahead of print.

For more see “Research – exposure assessment
Go to abstract>

Go to full summary >


ICNIRP guidelines revisions needed; lowering the reference levels for frequencies around 2-5 GHz.

The objective of the study was to assess the variation in specific absorption rate (SAR)from 300 to 5,000 MHz using 15 different voxel models and also postures by applying the parallel finite-difference time-domain method. Results indicate that for an adult, the effect of incoming direction on whole-body SAR is larger in the GHz range than at around 300-450 MHz; the effect is also stronger with vertical polarization. Results are similar for a child other than for 300 MHz for horizontal polarization. Body posture has almost no influence on whole-body SAR in the GHz range, but at around 300-450 MHz, a rise in whole-body SAR is seen if posture changes from the standing position. It was noted that posture influenced peak 10 g SAR more than whole-body SAR. A homogenized model underestimated whole-body SAR around 2 GHz. Restrictions set by International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) are exceeded in the smallest voxel models at the reference level of exposure, and in some adult phantoms, they are close to the limit. The peak 10 g SAR limits were never exceeded in the studied cases. The authors concluded that the research suggests the current ICNIRP guidelines could be lowered for frequencies between 2 and 5 GHz.

Uusitupa T, Laakso I, Ilvonen S, Nikoskinen K. SAR variation study from 300 to 5000 MHz for 15 voxel models including different postures. Phys Med Biol. Jan 28, 2010. 55(4):1157-1176. Ahead of print.

For more see “Research – exposure assessment
Go to abstract>

Go to full summary >


Study of exposure from wireless systems and changes in power variations.

The objective of the research paper was to give the possible exposure scenarios modern digital wireless systems with an emphasis on the time power variations. The authors say their results should be relevant for experimental biological and human studies when exposure in proximity to real systems is considered. The authors concluded that the time variations may not have a significant biological effect, but since they are part of many experimental studies, it is critical to have the detailed information. Also, it’s possible there may be electromagnetic compatibility problems with body-worn devices.

Andersen JB, Mogensen PE, Pedersen GF. Power variations of wireless communication systems. Bioelectromagnetics. Jan 28, 2010. Ahead of print.

For more see “Research – exposure assessment
Go to abstract>

Go to full summary >


Rowley JT, Milligan MJ. (Comment) Studies of Mobile Phone Use and Brain Tumor Risk Are Independent of Industry Influence. J Clin Oncol. Jan 25, 2010. Ahead of print.

For more see “Research – epidemiological – cell phone studies
Go to abstract>


Stang A, Schmidt-Pokrzywniak A, Kuss O. (Comment) Arbitrary Results of a Meta-Analysis on Cancer Risks Among Mobile Phone Users. J Clin Oncol. Jan 25, 2010. Ahead of print.

For more see “Research – epidemiological – cell phone studies
Go to abstract>


Leszczynski D, Zhengping X. Mobile phone radiation health risk controversy: the reliability and sufficiency of science behind the safety standards. Health Research Policy and Systems. Jan 27, 2010. Ahead of print.

For more see “Research – epidemiological – cell phone studies
Go to abstract>


Dreyfuss JH. Mixed results on link between cellular telephones and cancer. CA Cancer J Clin. 60(1):5-6. Dec 16, 2010. Ahead of print.

For more see “Research – epidemiological – cell phone studies
Go to abstract>


The importance of the amplitude modulation in the interaction between electromagnetic fields and neocortical astrocytes.

This research paper studied the exposure of primary rat neocortical astroglial cell cultures to acute electromagnetic (EM) fields. Data demonstrate that even acute exposure to low intensity (EM) fields induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and DNA fragmentation in astrocytes in primary cultures, which also represent the principal target of modulated EMF. The findings suggest the hypothesis that the effects could be due to hyperstimulation of the glutamate receptors, which play a crucial role in acute and chronic brain damage.

Campisi A, Gulino M, Acquaviva R, Bellia P, Raciti G, Grasso R, Musumeci F, Vanella A, Triglia A. Reactive oxygen species levels and DNA fragmentation on astrocytes in primary culture after acute exposure to low intensity microwave electromagnetic field. Neurosci Lett. Feb 12, 2010. Ahead of print.

For more see “Research – laboratory – cancer studies
Go to abstract>

Go to full summary >


Lerchl A, Wilhelm AF. Critical comments on DNA breakage by mobile-phone electromagnetic fields (Diem et al., Mutation Research 2005, 583, 178-183). Mutat Res. Jan 22, 2010. Ahead of print.

For more see “Research – laboratory – cancer studies
Go to abstract>


Effect of radiofrequency radiation on passive avoidance behaviour in rats.

This research paper evaluated the effect of radiofrequency radiation from mobile phones on passive avoidance behaviour and hippocampal morphology in rats. It was found that mobile phone exposure significantly altered the passive avoidance behaviour and hippocampal morphology in rats.

Narayanan SN, Kumar RS, Potu BK, Nayak S, Bhat PG, Mailankot M. Effect of radio-frequency electromagnetic radiations (RF-EMR) on passive avoidance behaviour and hippocampal morphology in Wistar rats. Ups J Med Sci. Jan 23, 2010. Ahead of print.

For more see “Research – laboratory – brain function
Go to abstract>

Go to full summary >


Does low electromagnetic radiation affects human cells?

This research paper evaluates whether or not low intensity electromagnetic (EM) field associated with mobile phone use can affect human cells. It was found that 8 hour exposure to EM fields caused a significant increase in protein expression in Jurkat cells and human fibroblasts, and to a lesser extent in activated primary human white blood cells.

Gerner C, Haudek V, Schandl U, Bayer E, Gundacker N, Hutter HP, Mosgoeller W. Increased protein synthesis by cells exposed to a 1,800-MHz radio-frequency mobile phone electromagnetic field, detected by proteome profiling. Int Arch Occup Environ Health. Feb 10, 2010 Ahead of print.

For more see “Research – laboratory
Go to abstract>

Go to full summary >


Vignal R, Crouzier D, Dabouis V, Debouzy JC. (2009). Effects of mobile phones and radar radiofrequencies on the eye Pathol Biol. 57(6):503-8.

For more see “Research – bibliography – review papers – general
Go to abstract>



Home             Links              Sitemap               Contact Us
© McLaughlin Centre for Population Health Risk Assessment