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April 2010

No evidence that short-term exposure to TETRA handsets alters human cognitive function in humans

The objective of the study was to investigate changes in cognitive functions in humans exposed to waves from TETRA handsets. The study was conducted in a controlled climate chamber in a double-blind cross-over design. A total of 53 male individuals were tested on their performance in cognitive tasks during 45 minutes exposure to TETRA transmitters or to sham exposure. Participants also completed a computer-based questionnaire measuring self-reported psychological and physical symptoms. Results indicate that no statistically significant differences between the TETRA and sham exposures were detected for any of the cognitive tasks or symptoms. The authors concluded that they found no evidence which would show that short-term exposure to TETRA transmitters changes human cognitive function.

Riddervold IS, Kjærgaard SK, Pedersen GF, Andersen NT, Franek O, Pedersen AD, Sigsgaard T, Zachariae R, Mølhave L, Andersen JB. No effect of TETRA hand portable transmission signals on human cognitive function and symptoms. Bioelectromagnetics. March 8, 2010. Ahead of print.

For more see “Research – clinical – cognitive function
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Third-generation UMTS mobile phones considered safe for patients with pacemakers.

The objective of the study is to evaluate the possible interference of UMTS mobile phones with implanted pacemakers. A total of 100 patients with pacemakers participated in the study. The mobile phones were evaluated in 3 modes; standby, dialing, and operating mode with pacemakers. Electrocardiograms (ECGs), intracardiac electrograms, and marker channels were recorded during calls. Both UMTS mobile phones Nokia 6650 and Motorola A835 did not cause any interference with any pacemakers. The authors concluded that mobile phones were found to be safe for patients with pacemakers. They explain their results by the high-frequency band used in UMTS system (1,800-2,200 MHz) and the low power output (0.01 W and 0.25 W).

Ismail MM, Badreldin AM, Heldwein M, Hekmat K. Third-Generation Mobile Phones (UMTS) Do Not Interfere with Permanent Implanted Pacemakers. Pacing Clin Electrophysiol. Feb 18, 2010 Ahead of print.

For more see “Research – clinical – cardiovascular
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Proposed measurement method reduces measurement time in evaluation of WLAN exposure.

The objective of the study was to investigate levels of wireless local area network (WLAN) exposure and evaluate if it was in compliance with ICNIRP international standards for the general public. The exposure to WLAN access areas was tested in 222 locations for 7 WLAN functional networks in office environments. The WLAN exposure was also measured in a wireless sensor lab environment (WiLab). Results indicate that average background exposure to WLAN was 0.12 V/m and with the WiLab in operation it was 1.9 V/m. Results were all well below the ICNIRP guidelines (61 V/m) in the 2.4 GHz band. The authors concluded that by applying the fast and reliable procedure, the measurement method produces an important reduction in measurement time.

Verloock L, Joseph W, Vermeeren G, Martens L. (2010). Procedure for assessment of general public exposure from wlan in offices and in wireless sensor network testbed. Health Phys. 98(4):628-38.

For more see “Research – exposure assessment
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Simple technique to rapidly estimate power output emitted from WI-FI network

The objective of the experiment was to extend a new model of RF power emitted in WI-FI networks to include other conditions. In the study, results from the original model are validated and also the extended measurement techniques. Results are that the models are accurate with errors less than 5-10%. It was found that the highest power is when the network is used at its maximum capacity with a high volume of traffic. The authors provide a simple technique to estimate power output from traffic level data. They also give examples how this technique could be used to make predictions on power output emitted from WI-FI networks.

Fang M, Malone D. (2010). Experimental verification of a radiofrequency power model for wi-fi technology. Health Phys. 98(4):574-83.

For more see “Research – exposure assessment
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New methodology to determine whole-body specific absorption rate for Wifi in embryos and new-born rats

The objective of the experiment was to assess whole-body specific absorption rate for 2.4 GHz (Wifi) in embryos and new-born rats. The authors used a new simulation hybrid approach which they determined the detailed parameters by simulation. All possible variability factors having an impact on the global results were part of the analysis. The authors also discuss whole-body specific absorption rate information and the differences in rats at different ages.

Wu T, Hadjem A, Wong MF, Gati A, Picon O, Wiart J. Whole-body new-born and young rats' exposure assessment in a reverberating chamber operating at 2.4 GHz. Phys Med Biol. Feb 24, 2010;55(6):1619-1630. Ahead of print.

For more see “Research – exposure assessment
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No age-dependent changes of the averaged peak spatial SAR over the entire head

The objective of the study was to compare the absorption of radiofrequency fields emitted by mobile phones (peak spatial specific absorption rate (SAR)) in different areas of the brain cortex for various head phantoms of adults and children exposed to some models of mobile phones. The results indicate that significantly higher localized induced fields of more than 3 dB were found, for children measurements, in the cortex, hippocampus, hypothalamus, and the eye. Increase in localized induced fields (>10 dB) was higher in bone marrow explained by its significantly high conductivity. The authors concluded that their results confirm previous findings of no age-dependent changes of the averaged peak spatial SAR over the entire head.

Christ A, Gosselin MC, Christopoulou M, Kühn S, Kuster N. (2010). Age-dependent tissue-specific exposure of cell phone users.  Phys. Med. Biol. 55:1767-1783.

For more see “Research – exposure assessment
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Review of RF from mobile phone and health effects on nervous system

The review discusses the effects of exposure to radiofrequency fields emitted from mobile phones and its effect on the nervous system. Results of studies on GSM technology and electroencephalogram (EEG), evoked potentials, sleep EEG, cognitive performance, effects in children, auditory and vestibular function, and subjective symptoms (headaches, migraine, fatigue, skin itches) are described in this review. In summary, exposure to GSM mobile phones could have minor effects on brain activity although these changes have not been linked to any adverse health effects. Also, no consistent significant health effects on cognitive performance in adults have been observed.

van Rongen E, Croft R, Juutilainen J, Lagroye I, Miyakoshi J, Saunders R, de Seze R, Tenforde T, Verschaeve L, Veyret B, Xu Z. (2009)  Effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields on the human nervous system. J Toxicol Environ Health B Crit Rev. 12(8):572-97.

For more see “Research – reviews papers – behaviour
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Review of research on RF from mobile phones: Years 2004-2007

The review is an update to the original report of the Royal Society of Canada looking at research published from 2004 to 2007. New data on recent studies on dosimetry and exposure assessment, biological effects of radiofrequency fields, toxicological effects, including genotoxicity and carcinogenicity, epidemiological studies of mobile phone use, and human and animal studies of neurological and behavioural effects are presented. The authors state that they found no new clear evidence in the last 4 years of adverse health effects associated with RF fields. They proposed continued research to fill data gaps and address some areas of concern.

Habash RW, Elwood JM, Krewski D, Lotz WG, McNamee JP, Prato FS. (2009) Recent advances in research on radiofrequency fields and health: 2004-2007. J Toxicol Environ Health B Crit Rev. 12(4):250-88.

For more see “Research – reviews papers – general
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